Simple Android Login Page

ūüéĮ Overview

The blog post guides Android developers on creating a straightforward login page for their applications. It covers the essential components and layout structure required to design a login screen. The tutorial explains the usage of key XML elements such as ScrollView, LinearLayout, ImageView, TextInputLayout, EditText, Button, and TextView. Additionally, the post introduces the ButterKnife library, which simplifies the process of view binding in Android development. By following this tutorial, developers can learn how to create an aesthetically pleasing and functional login page while gaining insights into best practices for user interface design and view binding in Android applications.

ūüéĮ ScrollView

The ScrollView is a layout container that allows scrolling when the content inside exceeds the screen height. In this case, it wraps around the entire layout and defines the background color as #b2ebf2 (light blue).


<ScrollView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"

    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"

    android:layout_width="fill_parent"

    android:layout_height="fill_parent"

    android:background="#b2ebf2"

    android:fitsSystemWindows="true">

ūüéĮ LinearLayout

The LinearLayout is a vertical container that holds the login form elements. It has a width of match_parent, which means it will occupy the entire width of the screen. The paddingLeft, paddingTop, and paddingRight attributes add spacing around the elements inside.


<ImageView

    android:layout_width="wrap_content"

    android:layout_height="150dp"

    android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"

    android:layout_marginBottom="25dp"

    android:src="@mipmap/ic_launcher" />

ūüéĮ ImageView and TextInput

The ImageView displays an image at the center of the layout. It has a height of 150dp and uses the ic_launcher image as the source. The layout_gravity attribute centers the image horizontally, and layout_marginBottom adds a margin at the bottom. 

The rest of the XML code defines the email and password input fields, login button, and signup link. To explain each element in detail would be repetitive, as they follow a similar structure. However, it's worth mentioning that the TextInputLayout is used to wrap the EditText fields, providing additional features like the floating label effect and error handling.

<ImageView

    android:layout_width="wrap_content"

    android:layout_height="150dp"

    android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"

    android:layout_marginBottom="25dp"

    android:src="@mipmap/ic_launcher" />

ūüéĮ Full Source for Login XML

<ScrollView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"

xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"

    android:layout_width="fill_parent"

    android:layout_height="fill_parent"

    android:background="#b2ebf2"

    android:fitsSystemWindows="true">


    <LinearLayout

        android:layout_width="match_parent"

        android:layout_height="wrap_content"

        android:orientation="vertical"

        android:paddingLeft="24dp"

        android:paddingTop="80dp"

        android:paddingRight="24dp">


        <ImageView

            android:layout_width="wrap_content"

            android:layout_height="150dp"

            android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"

            android:layout_marginBottom="25dp"

            android:src="@mipmap/ic_launcher" />


        <!--  Email Label -->

        <android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout

            android:layout_width="match_parent"

            android:layout_height="wrap_content"

            android:layout_marginTop="8dp"

            android:layout_marginBottom="8dp">


            <EditText

                android:id="@+id/password"

                android:layout_width="match_parent"

                android:layout_height="wrap_content"

                android:hint="Email"

                android:inputType="textEmailAddress" />

        </android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout>


        <!--  Password Label -->

        <android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout

            android:layout_width="match_parent"

            android:layout_height="wrap_content"

            android:layout_marginTop="8dp"

            android:layout_marginBottom="8dp">


            <EditText

                android:id="@+id/input_password"

                android:layout_width="match_parent"

                android:layout_height="wrap_content"

                android:hint="Password"

                android:inputType="textPassword" />

        </android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout>


        <android.support.v7.widget.AppCompatButton

            android:id="@+id/btn_login"

            android:layout_width="fill_parent"

            android:layout_height="wrap_content"

            android:layout_marginTop="24dp"

            android:layout_marginBottom="24dp"

            android:padding="12dp"

            android:text="Login" />


        <TextView

            android:id="@+id/link_signup"

            android:layout_width="fill_parent"

            android:layout_height="wrap_content"

            android:layout_marginBottom="24dp"

            android:gravity="center"

            android:text="No account yet? Create one"

            android:textSize="16dip" />


    </LinearLayout>

</ScrollView>

ūüéĮ Manifest

<activity

    android:name=".Login"

    android:label="@string/title_activity_login"

    android:parentActivityName=".MainActivity"

    android:theme="@style/AppTheme.NoActionBar">

    <meta-data

        android:name="android.support.PARENT_ACTIVITY"

        android:value="com.thiyagaraaj.apptrace.MainActivity" />

</activity>

This code snippet declares an activity called "Login" in the manifest file. The android:name attribute specifies the class name for the activity, which is .Login. The android:label attribute assigns a string resource to be used as the activity's label. The android:parentActivityName attribute defines the parent activity for this activity, which is .MainActivity. The android:theme attribute sets the theme for this activity to "AppTheme.NoActionBar," indicating that it does not have an action bar.

ūüéĮ Bind to Java

@BindView(R.id.input_email) EditText _emailText;

@BindView(R.id.input_password) EditText _passwordText;

@BindView(R.id.btn_login) Button _loginButton;

@BindView(R.id.link_signup) TextView _signupLink;

To read values

String email = _emailText.getText().toString();

String password = _passwordText.getText().toString();

These lines of code use the @BindView annotation from the ButterKnife library to bind the XML views to their respective Java objects.

@BindView(R.id.input_email) EditText _emailText;

@BindView(R.id.input_password) EditText _passwordText;

@BindView(R.id.btn_login) Button _loginButton;

@BindView(R.id.link_signup) TextView _signupLink;

By using the @BindView annotation, ButterKnife automatically initializes these Java objects with the corresponding views from the XML layout, saving you from manually calling findViewById for each view.

After binding the views, you can then use these objects to interact with the UI elements in your Java code. For example, you can retrieve the text entered in the email and password fields by calling _emailText.getText().toString() and _passwordText.getText().toString(), respectively.

Overall, ButterKnife simplifies the view binding process and reduces boilerplate code, making it easier to work with UI elements in Android development.

ūüéĮ Demo Screen